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28/01/2022

What Work Do You Really Want To Do In 2022?

By Drake WorkWise

The rules are forever changing when it comes to  being a close contact or contracting COVID-19. Spending time in isolation is very much a normal experience in today's world - however, there’s many emotions including anxiety that occur before and during a period of isolation. Whether you’re awaiting test results, in the midst of your isolation period or simply preparing for what may be yet to come, this article explores some tips to surviving your week of isolation and aims to help prepare for the feelings and emotions you’ll likely face.

Maintain a schedule (if you’re feeling up to it)

It is important to maintain a schedule as best as you can. If you’re able to work during isolation, then wake up at the same time as you usually would, change into your work clothes, work your usual hours and try to separate your work area from your relaxing space so that you can ‘turn off’ at the end of the work day.

Communicate

Just because your movement is limited within a home, doesn’t mean your communication has to be limited too. Stay in touch with the outside world - whether calling friends or family members, scheduling video calls or sending text messages, it is important to keep up your lines of communication.

Consume nutritious food 

Ensure your pantry and fridge is well stocked with healthy food and drinks to survive a week at home. If you have COVID and are feeling mediocre, it’s even more important to maintain your recommended daily nutrients. If you didn’t manage to stock up on supplies before starting your isolation, be sure to ask a friend or family member for some help. 

Find a hobby

You may find that every day life gets in the way of partaking in your favourite pastimes. The good news is that time in lockdown can offer the perfect opportunity to pick up an old hobby, within the limits of a confined space. Whether learning an instrument, doing an online yoga class, being artistic and painting or drawing, or doing something else - use your time wisely!

Go easy on yourself

Embracing the quiet is not always easy. A whole week in isolation is likely to come with immense feelings and emotions that you may not have anticipated. You may find yourself feeling lonely, sad, angry, bored, hungry, tired, or any other range of emotions. Whatever you’re feeling, you are not alone. Be compassionate and kind to yourself, and embrace and accept the feelings and emotions associated with this experience.

Everyone’s isolation experience is different - it’s difficult to predict exactly how everyone will react. Time is likely to pass by faster if you’re; mentally prepared for the period of isolation, settled in, embracing and accepting the quietness or feelings of boredom or frustration, and prepared  to get back into everyday life. Make the most of this time, because like everything in life - this too shall pass!

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